A Specialist in General Wellness?

Where have all the generalist gone, long time passing.  When will they ever learn?  There are over two hundred specialties in the AMA master list of medical professionals. The question becomes, how can a specialist function with a chaotic physiology?  When the worldview of the medical specialist suggests that just one thing will heal a disease, has he considered the side effects of his remedy?  It does not matter if there is a drug, a vitamin, a mineral, or a medical procedure; they all must interact with human physiology in complex ways. 

This idea of promoting one thing for health or even just one thing for repairing a malady of the body is less than desirable. The vitamin D community that is promoting health through just one purposeful necessity is a huge error.  This has been the mistake in the understanding of vitamins and minerals for healing of disease. Think of the confusion brought about by Linus Pauling in promoting vitamin C, or the legal battles fought over magnesium deficiency. Now, we have the Vitamin D Revolution.  All are needed, none should be left out.  The interactions of vitamins and minerals is very important to wellness.

Don’t get me wrong. vitamin D3 is a master prohormone that is necessary for a healthy life. This necessity has developed through our relationship with the sun.  As we have moved indoors out of the sunshine, the argument has become not that we need vitamin D3, but how much and from what source.  If we raise the level of vitamin D in our body, the need for other vitamins and minerals will show itself in other side effects.  For example, if you don’t have an adequate amount of magnesium with increased vitamin D, you may have heart arrhythmias.  This problem becomes even worse when applying drugs to a disease.  In particular for drugs that are analogs of what the body expects.  Think about how many times the physician prescribes one drug and then many others for the side effects. The problem then becomes do we apply drugs or nutrition first for chronic disease?  The body normally is deficient in nutrition and not deficient in drugs.  The money–is in medical procedures, drugs, and medical insurance.

There is some hope as we have moved in the direction of nutrition for the treatment of chronic disease.  Consider the number of facilities that now offer integrative medicine. Integrative medicine is where conventional Western medicine is combined with nutrition, exercise, and other medical arts.  You cannot define the human body with one illness, thus separating its wholeness.  This reminds me of the movie where Jack Palance tells Billy Crystal that the secret of life is just one thing.  Jack then tells Billy he will need to figure it out.  Does Billy need to find a specialist? We have spent inexpressible amounts of money and effort to find this one thing for one disease.  It does not exist unless you point toward God, or whatever reality you wish to define in our superhuman existence.

It’s time for the world of medicine to accept the fact that complexity cannot be resolved through specialty.   It takes both specialist and generalist to reach healthy solutions for healing disease.  There should be more generalist than specialist.  M. Scott Peck wrote about how specialties lead to evil.  Think of an institution where the individuals it serves are not given any empathy and only the survival of the institution is the important thing.  Peck’s “People of the Lie” is an important read in understanding of how evil presents itself through specialization. 

hammerJust in the last two weeks, I’ve had three different people tell me how much better they have felt by replacing drugs with nutrition and exercise.  One lady who was taking twelve different drugs has replaced all but one. Now, she is looking for what is missing in her life experience to eliminate the last drug.  Why does an individual have to spend the effort of doing their own research when solutions could be delivered by the medical profession?  What has happened to the consultant who suggest a drug for a short term solution and nutrition required for a long term solution? We seem to have the drugs and surgery worked out.  A man with a hammer will always look for nails.  When will they ever learn?  –Pandemic Survivor 

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Opioid Induced Constipation and Magnesium

We are constantly bombarded with ads for drugs. The most recent astonishment was a drug to relieve constipation caused by pain killers.  Specially, opiate type pain killers and the malady has the name opioid-induced constipation (OIC).   I had this problem for the years that I was on opiate pain killers.  There is a simple solution that results in a remarkable to return to health and energy.  When you have constipation from taking opiate pain killers the solution is magnesium.  Constipation is a warning signal that you are deplete in magnesium. I solved the problem by taking 200 mg of magnesium citrate capsules twice per day. Not only did I gain relief from constipation, I was improving my problem with magnesium deficiency.

From Medical News Today:

“For the treatment of OIC, doctors may prescribe:

  • Osmotic laxatives – increase the amount of water in the gut, increasing bulk and softening stools.
  • Emollient or lubricant cathartics – soften and lubricate stools.
  • Bulk cathartics – increase bulk and soften stools.
  • Stimulant cathartics – directly counteract the effect of the opioid medications by increasing intestinal motility, helping the gut to push the stools along.
  • Prostaglandins or prokinetic drugs – change the way the intestines absorb water and electrolytes, and they increase the weight and frequency of stools while reducing transit time.
  • Other medicines block the effects of opioids on the bowel to reverse opioid-induced constipation.

Although the treatments listed above are usually successful in treating OIC, sometimes a physician will recommend rectal intervention.”

Wow and ouch, I just can’t imagine the effort to treat constipation; in particular, when you are in other pain.  Here is a list of drugs for OIC from Web MD.  The primary use of opiates is for treatment of pain resulting from spine and joint issues.  Here is what Spine Universe suggest for OIC.  In any case, there is no suggestion that you may have magnesium deficiency.

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Magnesium deficiency is a very serious problem.  It has been estimated that 68% of the population do not get the recommended daily intake. This article from Life Extension list the diseases associated with magnesium deficiency as well as the battles of correcting the problem in the general population.  You can also read more about the diseases associated with magnesium deficiency as well as many peer reviewed papers at the Magnesium Library Online.

The issue with magnesium deficiency is no blood test to tell you if you have enough for health.  The serum test that is used only measures what is in the blood stream which does not correlate to what is inside the cells.  Many prescription drugs deplete the body of magnesium. Chronic pain can cause deficiency in magnesium.  One of the primary issues with low energy is not enough magnesium.  Magnesium is the positive ion that carries the energy molecules (ADP-ATP) to supply energy to the biological actions in your body.

I think the best understanding in simple terms can be found from Krispin, a lifelong nutritionist. She describes the diseases from deficiency and how to supplement for the best benefit of health.  She states that it may take six months of supplementation to get the full benefits of health. One important take away for you is that vitamin D3 needs magnesium to work properly.  If you have a serious problem with constipation, contact your doctor.  To your health and proper bowel movements!  –Pandemic Survivor